Pattern Play Saturday

Allez-parquet!

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Having some fun on a weekend getting the creative juices flowing with these pattern tiles. Cut into triangles, I can reposition them into different patterns before laminating into a substrate to add thickness and use as a furniture surface. I'm thinking stool seat.

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Pretty good use of these short offcuts from other projects.  Japanese inspired methods.  

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Antique Walnut Chair Restoration

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I'm not sure how old this piece is, I've been working on restoring it all week and we finally glued it up yesterday. It's definitely sit-able now with the back re-attached. Only had to remake the curved rails and the verticals before sticking everything on the old mortises.

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Barn wood... So Hot Right Now

We've been working here at the shop with a lot of reclaimed barn wood lately. Here's a counter base and a sliding door we fabricated and installed locally.

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Reclaimed wood is great and all, I'm excited to get back to square lumber, though. 

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Hockey Stick Bench

This bench is a product our shops neighborhood, Englewood, and the Englewood Community Development Corporation. There are some people really hard at work here trying to get this little area of ours at Rural St. and Washington into better shape through education, industry and artistry. One of the only places in the city you'll hear street hockey from the rooftops. 

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The sticks in this bench were used by local youth at the rooftop court behind our old shop. The cast iron legs had a healthy patina, so we had them sand blasted and powder coated. 

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Walnut Sculptural Counter Leg

I recently fabricated this stack laminated bricklayed arch out of walnut for Matthew Osborn. This will be a support for a granite peninsula in a kitchen. 

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He's been carving it into a tubular profile that flares out at the top. Follow his updates on Instagram.  

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The center the sections have big bolts through them where the "bricks" overlap for added structural stability.

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Just Keep Mortising

104 joints later and this suite of chairs is about is about halfway there. This project really makes me appreciate the square mortising machine we had at school, and I'm determined to find a similar solution for our shop after a week of this. The Festool Domino was a decent stand in for a horizontal mortiser, but squaring all the corners and cleaning up the rough surfaces left by the drill bit back to the scribed line was time intensive. 

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We could also use a tenoning jig, but it's easy enough to rig something up on an existing sled that it's not quite worth the investment, yet. These chairs are not glued, test fitting will allow me to adjust any joints that aren't perfect and pull everything together before we disassemble to stain and finish before final glue up. 

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Gustav Stickley 353 Side Chairs

Red Oak cut and planed, ready to cut to length and add the joinery. I've never worked from plans before, but I got this far in one day, so I'm not knocking it. 

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These will be stained dark brown to varnished to match the trestle table and bench from my previous post.

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Redwood Slabs

I've been hanging onto these for a few years now making my shopmates drool, it's about time to get then flattened out and turned into something useful. They're quite large, and together well, but would also function nicely as individual pieces. I've always wanted to turn the trio into a high class picnic table like design with a Nakishima dining table base the big one, flanked by carcasses underneath the lower slabs. 

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Trestle Table

I've been fabricating pieces for fellow Herron alumni, Matthew Osborn lately. Here's a trestle table he designed and I built in our shop made out of red oak and stained dark before applying a conversion varnish. 

The sleeve in the center asked the table to expand.  

The sleeve in the center asked the table to expand.  

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Fight Club Script Binding and Packaging

Client commissioned work to bind a movie script. Really fun project to brainstorm and knock out overnight. Japanese stab binding is one of my favorite styles, and anyone can learn it! The secret is to use one sheet of cardstock as a template to punch a few pages at a time. 

Custom packaging to match special edition DVD case I happened to have on hand for reference. The return address design is based on a business card seen briefly in the movie. 

Custom packaging to match special edition DVD case I happened to have on hand for reference. The return address design is based on a business card seen briefly in the movie. 

I broke out the old Helldorado red oak letters for the Kraft covers. I applied a thin coat of van son oil-based warm red without much padding to get the uneven effect. 

I broke out the old Helldorado red oak letters for the Kraft covers. I applied a thin coat of van son oil-based warm red without much padding to get the uneven effect. 

Blast from the Past.

Reppin #herronfurniture, four years and counting.

Reppin #herronfurniture, four years and counting.

Stopped by Herron the other night to see an alumni show featuring Ashton Dame and Rob Young. Happened upon this bulletin board that's been up since 2011 for the Basile Center bench commissions. Whoever is in charge either lost the keys or just enjoys laughing at these silly pictures everyday.

Matthew Osborn

Matthew Osborn is not only one of the hardest working woodworkers I know, he's also a pro at running a maker space and tracking down grants. 

Matthew Osborn is not only one of the hardest working woodworkers I know, he's also a pro at running a maker space and tracking down grants. 

What is one thing that the creative/design community can do in Indianapolis to help grow an audience for custom or handcrafted work? 

I think that word of mouth is hugely important. Recommending other makers/artists makes a big difference. I think that the more you talk about people’s work and the importance of hand made work, the more people think about what they are buying and what they are supporting. 

Source: http://www.patternindy.com/2016/02/29/maker-of-the-month-osborn-design-craft/